tell your story

The point of Small Stories, Big Changes is that individuals can make a difference. These writers are simply people like you and me. What differentiates them is that they have become activists. Perhaps you have taken action in the name of sustaining life on this garden planet. If so, we would like to know about it. Email your story, and a photograph to lyle@biofuels.coop and we will do our best to publish it here…

-2Judy HoganAndy ZemanTarus26-2-1

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One comment on “Tell Us Your Story
  1. I admire what you guys are doing! I was just traveling for the past 28 months, volunteering on farms in New Zealand and Australia, and volunteering as an English Teacher in Southeast Asia. I was last in the Philippines, where I survived the typhoon! I befriended a group of permaculturists who are doing amazing things. Here is a video about them, please watch if you have the time!

    Here is the email I sent out to family and friends:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t0G50FDzZTE

    Watch this video! It made me cry. All the people in it are my friends, several of them healed me when I was very sick. At 3:00, one of my spiritual gurus Pi Villaraza starts talking, he is the guy who made the video. I have a few books written by him if anyone is interested. At 6:00 Maui starts talking, who helped me a lot emotionally, and listened to me for hours talking about Grandad and Jeni. He gave me my yellow mala beads that you may see me wearing.

    This video is part two of how my friends are doing permaculture – AND A LOT MORE – in a tiny village in the Philippines. Their small-scale work is a global example for disaster relief.

    This is what people should be watching when they want to learn about what is happening in the Philippines. All that negativity on the news is not productive. Here are the people who deserve to be recognized.

    Quotes from the video:

    “They lost everything, and they are willing to let go, and accept that they don’t have it anymore. After experiencing all the suffering, because of their simple lifestyle, its easier for them to let go of their material possessions. These people already had a very simple life, but now they have simplified even more.

    When I look at my life, I have a tendency to compare. We forget to appreciate the things we already have, which is very much more… we have more blessings and comfort and luxury, but we just look at the problems and the smallest inconvenience and never appreciate the blessings we have, which is a lot. Coming here helped me realize i have so much to offer, and so much more to simplify, and be grateful for.” ~Maui

    “Trust. Everything happens for a reason. All we speak to carries a message. Imagine if we were able to experience life in a way that allows us to trust more. The more we trust, an opening is created for the blessings to come forth. We start to sense a deeper awareness of the world.” ~Pi

    “This is a reaffirmation that the opportunity is greater than the problem. A lot of time is spent focusing on problems and things that are wrong with the world, but it doesn’t take us anywhere positive. Continually focusing on everything that’s wrong, more wrong things happen. Its just a basic thing of energy!”

    “I saw this situation through the television in France, and that was looking like a real disaster. We just think: wow. this is terrible. This is like the worst thing that can happen. That was my plan to come here and help those people who are really in need. So i came here, I saw so many children, those people really simple, and yeah. The most amazing thing was the smiles of the people. They lose everything, as they said on the media in France, and they just keep smiling all the time. They smile more than in my culture you know?”

    Love from Amber

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"Lyle Estill tells the amazing story of how a biofuel company became, among other things, a worm ranch, a garlic farm, a housing coop, and a foundation. In short, Industrial Evolution reveals how a vibrant business created a resilient community, able to ride out the credit crunch, Depression 2.0, and whatever else is thrown at the folks at Piedmont Biofuels."
Novella Carpenter, author of Farm City: The Education of an Urban Farmer